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Mathematical INstitute @ Tel Aviv

Coordinators

  • Noga Alon
  • Michael Krivelevich
  • Leonid Polterovich

The Institute supports a variety of research-related activities at the School of Mathematical Sciences of TAU, including distinguished lectures, visitors, organization of workshops and travel of research students.

Advisory Board

  • Yakov Eliashberg (Stanford University)
  • Peter Sarnak (Princeton University and IAS)
  • Alain-Sol Sznitman (ETH, Z├╝rich)

Upcoming MINT Distinguished Lectures

Gil Kalai (Hebrew University)

Date Day Time Location Title
2017-12-03 Sun 10:05 Schreiber 309 The combinatorics of convex polytopes via linear programming and beyond
2017-12-04 Mon 12:15 Schreiber 006 The combinatorics of convex polytopes and the simplex algorithm for linear programming

Gil Kalai (Hebrew University)

Date Day Time Location Title
2017-12-03 Sun 10:05 Schreiber 309 The combinatorics of convex polytopes via linear programming and beyond
2017-12-04 Mon 12:15 Schreiber 006 The combinatorics of convex polytopes and the simplex algorithm for linear programming

Abstracts:


The combinatorics of convex polytopes via linear programming and beyond

I will show how the basic properties of linear programming lead to deep and beautiful combinatorial theorems about convex polytopes. I will discuss especially the upper bound theorem and the reconstruction of the full combinatorics of simple polytopes from their graphs.


The combinatorics of convex polytopes and the simplex algorithm for linear programming

Linear programming is the problem of maximizing a linear function subject to a system of linear inequalities. The set of solutions for the linear inequalities is a convex polytope P (which can be unbounded). The simplex algorithm was developed by George Danzig. Geometrically it can be described by moving from one vertex to a neighboring vertex as to improve that value of the objective function. The precise rule for choosing the next vertex is called the "pivot rule".

The simplex algorithm is one of the most successful mathematical algorithms. Understanding this success is an applied question, it is a vaguely stated, and it connects with computers. The problem has strong relations to the study of convex polytopes that mathematicians found fascinating from ancient times and was my own starting point.

After a brief overview of the history of the subject I will concentrate on diameter of graphs of polytopes and on randomized pivot rules.

Sergey Fomin (University of Michigan)

Date Day Time Location Title
2017-12-13 Wed 14:10 Schreiber 309 TBA
2017-12-18 Mon 12:15 Schreiber 006 TBA

Sergey Fomin (University of Michigan)

Date Day Time Location Title
2017-12-13 Wed 14:10 Schreiber 309 TBA
2017-12-18 Mon 12:15 Schreiber 006 TBA

Abstracts:


TBA


TBA

TBA

Benny Sudakov (ETH Zürich)

Date Day Time Location Title
2018-01-01 Mon 12:15 Schreiber 006 TBA
TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA

Benny Sudakov (ETH Zürich)

Date Day Time Location Title
2018-01-01 Mon 12:15 Schreiber 006 TBA
TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA

Abstracts:


TBA


TBA